I want to say to you, read the book, the Pearl of Great Price, and read the Book of Abraham. The Pearl of Great Price I hold to be one of the most intelligent, one of the most religious books that the world has ever had; but more than that, to me the Pearl of Great Price is true in its name. It contains an ideal of life that is higher and grander and more glorious than I think is found in the pages of any other book unless it be the Holy Bible. It behooves us to read these things, understand them: and I thank God when they are attacked, because it brings to me, after a study and thought, back to the fact that what God has given He has given, and He has nothing to retract." - Levi Edgar Young, Conference Report (April 1913), 74

"...it must be evident to all who seriously consider the matter, that if the Book of Abraham as given to us by Joseph Smith be true, it must have been translated by a greater than human power." - George Reynolds, The Book of Abraham: Its Authenticity Established as a Divine and Ancient Record (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1879), 4

Friday, August 12, 2016

A Collection of Lion Couch Scenes

The following images are provided for convenience in comparing the similarities and differences between lion couch scenes. The images were obtained online and references will be added in the future. This is a preliminary draft since this collection does not attempt to provide any context (and limited referencing for now), rather, it simply attempts to collect similar images for purposes of future study. The few references below have not yet been corroborated. This post is a work in process.




Mural at Opet Temple in Karnak

Book of the Dead scene on tomb wall of Twosret and Setnakhte



Anubis preparing the body of Sennedjen (also here and here)





Tomb of Sennedjem


(Same as above):




Tombs of the Kings, Thebes




















































A detail from a Book of the Dead, on papyrus showing hieratic writing of Hornefer, 
Ptolemaic Period, provenance unknown. (Museo Castello Sforzesco, Milan); image by Mark Cartwright







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