"I want to say to you, read the book, the Pearl of Great Price, and read the Book of Abraham. The Pearl of Great Price I hold to be one of the most intelligent, one of the most religious books that the world has ever had; but more than that, to me the Pearl of Great Price is true in its name. It contains an ideal of life that is higher and grander and more glorious than I think is found in the pages of any other book unless it be the Holy Bible. It behooves us to read these things, understand them: and I thank God when they are attacked, because it brings to me, after a study and thought, back to the fact that what God has given He has given, and He has nothing to retract." - Levi Edgar Young, Conference Report (April 1913), 74

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Janne Sjodahl on Kolob

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 
 
In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  In the following month (the March 1913 issue of the Era), responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young.  The responses were summarized thus:


Subsequently, in the April 1913 issue of the Era, responses were published from Osborn J.P. Widtsoe, N.L. Nelson, as well as Spalding's response to Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Elder John A. Widtsoe's response to Spalding, and an article on Kolob by Janne M. Sjodahl.  The following extract is from Janne Sjodahl regarding "Kolob":

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Elder John A. Widtsoe

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 
 
In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  In the following month (the March 1913 issue of the Era), responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young.  The responses were summarized thus:


Subsequently, in the April 1913 issue of the Era, responses were published from Osborn J.P. Widtsoe, N.L. Nelson, as well as Spalding's response to Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Elder John A. Widtsoe's response to Spalding, and an article on Kolob by Janne M. Sjodahl.  The following extract is from Elder John A. Widtsoe's response to Franklin Spalding's response:

Franklin Spalding's Response to Elder Widtsoe

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding in regards to the Book of Abraham.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in his approach to attacking Latter-day scriptures. While non-Mormons believed the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.

Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming from responses, mostly from Latter-day Saints, appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Church leaders such as B.H. Roberts, John A. Widtsoe, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith contributed, as well as other notables, Janne Sjodahl, Junius F. Wells, Levi Edgar Young, and non-Mormon Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans). Franklin Spalding responded to Elder Widtsoe's comments, which was published in the April 1913 issue of the Era; included below. Elder Widtsoe subsequently responded to Spalding, and was included in the same issue: 

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Responses to Franklin Spalding - N.L. Nelson

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator. While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding. Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit that he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day Saint scriptures. While non-Mormons believed that the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it to be unconvincing. Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Subscribers to the periodical were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (IE 16/3:280), as follows:

 
In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists. Notice was also posted regarding follow up responses in the subsequent issue (IE 16/4:404):
 

In the March 1913 issue of the Era, responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young. These articles were summarized thus (IE 16/5:530):


Subsequently, in the April 1913 issue of the Era (IE 16/6), responses were published from Osborn J.P. Widtsoe, N.L. Nelson, as well as Spalding's response to Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Elder John A. Widtsoe's response to Spalding, and an article on Kolob by Janne M. Sjodahl. The following extract is from N.L. Nelson:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Osborn J.P. Widtsoe

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator. While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding. Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit that he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day Saint scriptures. While non-Mormons believed that the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it to be unconvincing. Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Subscribers to the periodical were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (IE 16/3:280), as follows:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists. Notice was also posted regarding follow up responses in the subsequent issue (IE 16/4:404):
 

In the March 1913 issue of the Era, responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young. These articles were summarized thus (IE 16/5:530):
 
 
Subsequently, in the April 1913 issue of the Era (IE 16/6), responses were published from Osborn J.P. Widtsoe, N.L. Nelson, as well as Spalding's response to Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Elder John A. Widtsoe's response to Spalding, and an article on Kolob by Janne M. Sjodahl.  The following extract is from Osborn J.P. Widtsoe:

Saturday, March 17, 2012

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Richard W. Young

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator. While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding. Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit that he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day Saint scriptures. While non-Mormons believed that the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it to be unconvincing. Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Subscribers to the periodical were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (IE 16/3:280), as follows:

 
In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists. Notice was also posted regarding follow up responses in the subsequent issue (IE 16/4:404):

 
In the March 1913 issue of the Era, responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young. These articles were summarized thus (IE 16/5:530):


The following extract is from Judge Richard W Young:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - John A. Widtsoe

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator. While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding. Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit that he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day Saint scriptures. While non-Mormons believed that the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it to be unconvincing. Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Subscribers to the periodical were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (IE 16/3:280), as follows:

 
In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists. Notice was also posted regarding follow up responses in the subsequent issue (IE 16/4:404):


In the March 1913 issue of the Era, responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young. These articles were summarized thus (IE 16/5:530):


The following extract is from John A. Widtsoe:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Robert C. Webb

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding. Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing. The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet. The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit that he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day Saint scriptures. While non-Mormons believed that the publication was immensely successful, most Latter-day Saints found it to be unconvincing. Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912. Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era. Subscribers to the periodical were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (IE 16/3:280), as follows:


In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  Notice was also posted regarding follow up responses in the subsequent issue (IE 16/4:404):

 
In the March 1913 issue of the Era, responses included Robert C. Webb (alias for J.E. Homans), Elder John A. Widtsoe, and Richard W. Young. These articles were summarized thus (IE 16/5:530):


The following extract is from Robert C. Webb:

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Joseph F. Smith

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from the Prophet Joseph F. Smith:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Levi Edgar Young

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from Levi Edgar Young:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - John Henry Evans

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:


In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from John Henry Evans:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Junius F. Wells

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from Junius F. Wells:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Frederick J. Pack

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from Frederick J. Pack:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - Janne M. Sjodahl

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from Janne M. Sjodahl:

Responses to Franklin Spalding - B.H. Roberts

In 1912, Bishop Franklin Spalding published his pamphlet, Joseph Smith, Jr., As A Translator.  While it was meant to destroy faith in the Book of Mormon, it was much more effective in raising non-Mormon awareness of the Book of Abraham and redirected much of the Latter-day Saint's attention to addressing issues raised by Spalding.  Both the Book of Mormon and the Book of Abraham were translated by the Prophet from various forms of Egyptian writing.  The Reverend's attempt to disprove Joseph's ability as a translator would, by inference, destroy confidence in him as a Prophet.  The responses by Latter-day Saints acknowledged Bishop Spalding's seemingly courteous approach, but also identified the deceit he employed in masking his true intentions in attacking Latter-day scriptures.  While non-Mormons believed the publication was impressively successful, most Latter-day Saints found it unconvincing.  Spalding's pamphlet was published in November 1912.  Forthcoming responses appeared in the Deseret News and were subsequently printed in the Improvement Era.  Subscribers to the Era were notified of pending responses in the January 1913 issue (V16, No 3): 280:
 

In the February 1913 issue, responses by B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, Frederick Pack, Junius F. Wells, John Henry Evans, Levi Edgar Young, and the Prophet Joseph F. Smith were all included to address some of the issues raised by Spalding and the Egyptologists.  The following extract is from Elder B.H. Roberts:

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Rev. Franklin S. Spalding - Joseph Smith as a Translator

As I noted in a previous posting on the Reverend Franklin Spalding: "Almost 100 years ago, Reverend Franklin Spencer Spalding, an Episcopalian Bishop in Utah, published a 36 page booklet that was circulated amongst LDS officials, college professors, high school teachers, and students. The pamphlet was meant to discredit the Book of Mormon by illustrating that Joseph Smith's ability to translate the facsimiles contained in the Book of Abraham could not hold up to the scrutiny of Egyptologists. If Reverend Spalding could successfully illustrate that Joseph did not translate Egyptian accurately, than it may be inferred that his translation of the Book of Mormon should not only be called into question, but dismissed altogether. Apparently it did not occur to Reverend Spalding that the success of his experiment was dependent on some logical fallacies, a subject that will be addressed in a later posting; nevertheless, Spalding's efforts elicited quite a response in relation to some potentially serious implications for the Book of Abraham." 

The response to Spalding's pamphlet came from B.H. Roberts, Janne Sjodahl, and other prominent Latter-day Saints, including the Prophet Joseph F. Smith, as well as non-Mormon R.C. Webb (alias for James Edward Homans). These responses were published in the Deseret News, and subsequently in the Improvement Era. The main points discussed in these responses include the contradictory claims made by the Egyptologists as well as not only their lack of objectivity, but their strong bias opposing Joseph Smith and Mormonism (also see Nibley's, Joseph Smith and the Critics), the conspicuously missing cover letter sent by Spalding to his secular authorities, the deceitful approach taken by Spalding (see The Ulterior Motives of Reverend Franklin S. Spalding), as well as identification of some positive support stemming from George Reynolds apologetic study of the Book of Abraham. In connection with this, it was also acknowledged that the Saints were ill-equipped to handle such technical issues with a scholarly response; however, it was sufficiently demonstrated that the Egyptologists were collectively unreliable, since accepting the interpretations by one Egyptologist would be opposed by the interpretations of another. At any rate, Spalding's pamphlet had limited success within Mormonism while being lauded as a raving success by other Protestants. Bishop Spalding's pamphlet is provided below.